Debbie's Blog

Van Till Family Farm & Winery


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Gardening Through the Eyes of a Child.

 

How many of you got your start with gardening

by following your garden mentor around during a garden tour.

I did.

And, if you were a young child, you were

allowed to be amongst the adults if you were quiet.

One had to be very quiet and that meant not saying anything

but listening to their conversation.

I don’t think it was just being around the vegetable plants

in the family garden that made me want to follow my mom around as she

showed her older sister, my Aunt Katie, the garden.

aunt katie and uncle al

Aunt Katie

I think it was seeing the garden through my mom and my aunt’s eyes.

They would ooh and ahh over the rhubarb and the tomatoes. And of

course admire the compost pile too! That is gold to many gardeners!

Now, granted, my mom had 7 children to make sure the weeds were

pulled, and plenty of boys to turn the compost pile and do lots of

the hard digging and pulling, but here were two grown ladies, with a

young girl in tow getting such delight out of looking at all the plants.

Fast forward a few years, and  in the same way,  I love showing visitors the

gardens that we have here at the winery.

I think a connection was established for me between people and plants

as I followed my aunt and mom around that inspires me even today.

There is a lot of pleasure in showing  guests how they too can grow the

same plants that we have, develop some of the same gardening skills

that we use and bring a little joy to their friends and family like we do

here at the winery through a garden at their homes.

Touring the garden

Touring the garden.

I would definitely attribute some of

my understanding of the joy plants can bring people was through watching the relationship my mom and aunt had during their garden tours.

So, come and enjoy our gardens and bring a friend and build that fun relationship

around your walk through the garden.

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Yes, Fresh Figs in Missouri

 

 

If you have lived in the south or have been to California,

you may have fond memories of tasting fresh figs at the farmers market or

picking them from a tree.

 

Moving to the Midwest, where the weather doesn’t just dip below freezing

for a few hours but stays there for days on end, which isn’t good growing conditions for figs, doesn’t mean that one needs to give up eating fresh figs.

 

Figs do grow in Missouri.  The first time I saw them growing outdoors was at Powell Gardens.

There was a row of plants next to a building and they were more like shrubs

than the large tree in our yard as a youth in Southern California.   But, to my amazement,

these shrubs did produce figs.  And if they could grow them, I figured, I could too.

After planting a rooted cutting, in our Courtyard here at the winery, I anxiously

waited for the plant to get big enough to produce figs.

I can laugh about it now, but I was a little discouraged during the first summer, since the plant got cut to the ground twice

by the well meaning gardeners whose weed eaters didn’t recognize an edible plant!

These young men hadn’t ever seen a fig tree or bush.

It would have helped if I had put a wire fence around it the first time, but

nonetheless, I planted another rooted cutting and this time I did protect it!  This year was the 3nd summer and it was loaded with figs!

Figs Fall 2017use also

See the brown figs just ripening this September. They were sweet and so good!

Figs ripen from the bottom to the top of the branch, so I would regularly check the bush throughout the fall for ripe figs.  They continued to ripen up to the first frost.

Figs Fall 2017 use

Here’s another shot.

Chef Marc featured a pizza special this fall topped with figs and paired it with our Missouri Chambourcin Wine.  He also included figs in a topping for his Pumpkin Soup that he was serving as an appetizer in the Wine Garden.  He and Wine Club Manager, Stephen, had paired this with Missouri Chardonel Wine.  To use figs in a savory dish was new for me, since our figs were always eaten up fresh.  That just gives me a reason to plant more next year.

In the years to come, guests can be on the lookout for the figs growing in our farmscape.  Maybe, some will be inspired to grow their own. Or, maybe seeing the fig leaves or fruit will just bring back memories of a time when figs were  enjoyed fresh.


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Amazing Amaryllis

Dutch amaryllis, Hippeastrum create a welcome show of beauty during the winter as many are given as gifts during the Christmas season.  But if you haven’t seen amaryllis bloom outdoors in the summer, you are invited to come out to the winery and see the display of amaryllis in full bloom in our gardens.

Amaryllis 2017

Here’s how we did it.

Last year the Amaryllis bulbs were kept in the wine cellar

where it was cool and dry until mid-March when they were planted in pots and brought out into a warm 65 degree environment and full sun.

 

They were grown outdoors in full sun as soon as the weather was above freezing.

Amaryllis 2017 6

The spent blooms were cut off, which is also known as dead-heading, and the  bulbs were watered all summer where they kept growing large and beautiful green leaves when kept in full sun.

Amaryllis on Porch

September 1st, we stopped watering, but kept the plants

outdoors in the full sun as the bulb begins to wind down and the leaves begin to dry up.

Amaryllis 2017 10

the pots were moved indoors where it would be above freezing and dry.  It can be in the dark during this time.

Do not remove the bulb from the pot as amaryllis don’t like to be disturbed.

Now, your amaryllis are ready to be brought out again in the spring and

your amaryllis have been trained to be summer flowers.

Amaryllis 2017 5

In California, my Grandfather Wagner loved amaryllis and propagated them.

IMG_0927 (002)

He and my grandmother lived at Newport Beach and then moved to the dessert in Hemet, CA and his amaryllis came with him.  his amaryllis would bloom during the summer and to see my amaryllis blooming in the summer reminds me of his influence in my life.

Amaryllis Wine Garden

Looking forward to sharing our love of wine and plants

with our guests!

In the garden or vineyard these days,

Debbie


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Farm to Thanksgiving Table

All went well with the wine pairing this weekend.  The favorite, hands down, went to the Medium Body Gravy

with roasted turkey paired with our  2013 Chambourcin wine.  It was a wonderful taste treat! The wine really enhanced the gravy and

vica versa.  Bits of Cliff’s handmade chicken/apple sausage really added depth to the gravy which

brought out the character of the wine.  In this case, the turkey was there for the gravy!

Here’s the recipe:

Gravy

Pair with Van Till Family Farm Winery 2013  Chambourcin Wine

4 ounces butter
6 ounces flour
6 each chicken/apple sausage links
2 tbsp olive oil
5 each shallots, sliced
1 tbsp mustard seed
1 tbsp black peppercorns
1 tsp coriander
1 tsp fennel seed
2 qts. turkey stock

In a saucepan over low heat, make a roux by melting the butter and stirring in the flour.
Cook the sausages according to package directions and dice into small pieces.  Reserve.
Add olive oil to a medium sized sauce pot over medium-high heat and caramelize the shallots
with mustard seeds, black peppercorns, coriander and fennel seed.  Add turkey stock and reduce
by one half, approximately 20 minutes.
Once reduced, strain mixture.  Place liquid back in pot and stir in roux.  Continue stirring over
medium heat until gravy becomes thick.  Add diced sausage.
Keep warm for use right away or refrigerate.
Enjoy!

The  favorite gravy for our “under 21 staff”, who couldn’t taste the wine part of the pairing,

was the Red Wine Gravy made with our 2013 Norton Wine, chicken livers from local free range birds and fresh sage from the garden.

They couldn’t pair with any wine, but they felt this one could stand alone.

Here’s that recipe:

 

Red Wine Gravy

4 Ounces chicken livers, or giblets

2 tbsp butter

1 1/4 cups diced onions

2 cloves garlic, diced

3 tbsp butter

2 tbsp flour

6 cups chick or turkey stock

1 cup Van Till Family Farm Winery 2013 Norton  Wine

1 sprig fresh sage

 

Saute livers, onion and garlic in sauce pot in butter until done.

Once brown, add the butter and flour  and mix well.  After 2 minutes,

deglaze with the red wine, stock and sage. Cook the gravy for at least 25 minutes

uncovered.  When it has reached the desired thickness, remove the sage and transfer

the mixture to a hand blender.  Blend until smooth.  Serve warm or refrigerate.

 

 

Cutting celery, onions and fresh sage from the farm garden.

Cutting celery, onions and fresh sage from the farm garden.

The cornbread dressing paired beautifully with the 2011 Chardonel Vintner’s Choice wine, which was finished

on oak.  The fresh sage, celery and onions harvested from the farm garden really made this pairing

smooth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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In spite of the freeze last week, the farmscape still had enough life left to harvest …

….for the up coming wine pairings for our Open House this Friday and Saturday.

Look at this sage!  The freeze didn’t bother it.

Sage with willows

It is beautiful and the succulent leaves will give great flavor for
the cornbread dressing.  You can see the willow hedge behind this sage.

This willow turns bright orange during the winter, which gives

a lot of color.

Cutting Celery is a great plant to have in the garden. It is easy to start from
seed and very hard to kill. I tend to be very successful with neglect, and this
one endures and survives.

cutting celery ready

The first time I had experienced growing celery was in California, when my oldest
sister, Kathy, spent  a summer working in a celery packing shed near Nipomo while she and I

attended California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo,

The fog would roll into the coastal hills
in the evening and roll out late morning and the weather was mild and gentle. Great
for celery. Well, Missouri weather has no such gentleness, but this celery does well
here. And, in spite of the freeze, it looks great!

Even the  grasshoppers are  hiding in here hoping to stay warm.

cutting celery ready

Onions are another plant that survived the freeze.

onions in veg bed

These are green onions that propagate themselves in the garden. They emerge first thing in the spring, slow down and just
sit there during the heat of the summer, and then start growing again during the cool
of the fall.  We use these to garnish salads that are served in The Wine Garden.

 

Now, I need to take the harvest and cook and sample.  Friday is our Open House

when we will be offering guests, who are tasting wines in the Wine Shop,

the opportunity to pair wines with samples of dishes that we serve for Thanksgiving

and during the holiday season.  We will be showing how red

wine can be paired with turkey.   The harvest from the farm will be an integral part of that

experience.  Stay tuned!


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The Team Goes to Show Me Zip Lines!

Last month, the team here at the winery had an opportunity to go to Show Me Zip Lines located at our neighbor’s farm 2 miles north on the highway.  We had the grandest time!

Gary Marmoy, Linda Haskell and I really did do the Zip Line.  We were the "older ones"!

Gary Marmoy, Linda Haskell and I really did do the Zip Line. We were the “older ones”!

Cliff and I wanted our team to be able to speak from experience when guests ask about the Zip Line which was opened this spring on the Swafford Family Ranch.  From my experience, it was awesome.  Not only was riding, hooked to a cable 10 to 200 feet up in the air a blast, but the tour guides shared their story as well as the story of the farm, which always makes the experience more meaningful.

Unique view of the trip up the hill through the farm with Torie Gillam and Brodie Daly.  Both of these are hard working high school students that are on our team!

Unique view of the trip up the hill through the farm with Torie Gillam and Brody Daly. Both of these are hard working high school students that are on our team!

As we rode to the top of the hill and our tour guide explained some of the history of the farm as well as what we were seeing, I could imagine what it must have been like to have lived there on the farm years ago.  That just added a dimension to the tour that was cool!

Rylie White, one of our new servers, coming in for a landing.

Rylie White, one of our new servers, coming in for a landing.

To also see the rocks in the canyon, up close, was an experience you just don’t get from driving around in the country.

Brody Daly on the beginner run.

Brody Daly on the beginner run.

After our tour, we hosted the Zip Line Staff for a pizza dinner and tour of our property.

 

Show Me zip Line Staff and families relaxing after enjoying a pizza dinner at our winery.  Look how relaxed they look!  They did a great job on our tour!

Show Me Zip Line Staff and families relaxing after enjoying a pizza dinner at our winery. Look how relaxed they look! They did a great job on our tour!

We enjoyed showing them around and explaining the Farm to Table aspect of our grounds and we sampled the alpine strawberries growing in The Courtyard.  It was very rewarding to hear the “wow” when the guests sampled those little strawberries that have such a robust flavor.  This helped me to realize that what I sometimes take for granted, can be really interesting to other farmers.

 

Now our staff can speak from experience when guests ask us about the Zip Line or if they ask if there is anything else to do nearby since we are a destination winery in a very rural setting.  Each of our staff can speak for themselves, but as for me, I had a grand time and enjoyed getting to know our neighbors.  Thanks for a great time!


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January on the Patio

Early in January  we had  some seriously cold weather, where the night temperature was nearly -6 degree with a wind chill factor of -17.  That’s cold!

Some of the plants in the patio didn’t survive.  We had moved the citrus and avocado to be under the big heater, so, they and many other plants did quite nicely.

Blooming geraniums during the winter.

Blooming geraniums during the winter.

This geranium is still blooming, 2 weeks later.

dead geraniums

This geranium, which stayed near the wall where there were large air leaks,  is toast.

Cuttings, taken from the plants on the patio, ready for the heat mat. This will give them the warmth they need to root and grow.

Cuttings, taken from the plants on the patio, ready for the heat mat.
This will give them the warmth they need to root and grow.

But, at least I was able to get some cuttings, and now they are sitting in a plastic tent indoors near a window, on a heat mat,  and in a few weeks these cuttings will root and I will be on my way to getting replacement plants for the ones that died.

The rose bush survived, being right next to the wall, but the blooms didn’t.

Roses that wilted during the freezing weather this month.

Roses that wilted during the freezing weather this month.

Here you can see the wilted blooms and  the little buds pushing new growth.

Regrowth where blooms had died due to freezing weather.

Regrowth where blooms had died
due to freezing weather.

When I cut off the wilted part, underneath is really healthy plant material, which has been recharging for the last 2 weeks.  In another week or so, we should have blooms.  In fact, here are a few that are ready to open.

Roses ready to bloom weeks after hard freeze.

Roses ready to bloom weeks after hard freeze.

It amazes me how quickly these plants can recover from a freeze or sometimes, when we forget to water, a drought!  Here on the patio, winter is a season where the roses don’t go dormant, they do slow down, and the geraniums bloom profusely.  But this year, I have a lot of plants that are in recovery because of the extreme cold.

.

This is what I do when it is 12 degrees outside!  This is good "inside" work!

This is what I do when it is 12 degrees outside! This is
good “inside” work!

Today, I have been having a grand time, working here in the patio.  Outside, the sun is shining and it is 12 degrees.  Inside, it is  55 degrees and no heater.   The Thompson Seedless grapevine and petunias  needed pruning and the ivy needs to be trained.

We have been busy in the winery this month and it is time to take care of the plants.  But, we always take time to test wine!

Here I am, testing the not yet released Sangria with the Southwest Gourmet Pizza.  It’s a great match!